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April 6 to June 26, 2016

 

The works in Bronx Focus: Paintings by Valeri Larko serve as a record of the vibrant graffiti culture as displayed in structures throughout the borough now, and on the verge of extinction. Larko’s paintings remind viewers of a Bronx that coexists as both a city and nature reserve, capable of gritty and touching beauty, while also focusing on themes of memory, preservation, and expansion. 

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April 6 to July 4, 2016

 

This exhibition highlights a group of sculptures by John Ahearn and Rigoberto Torres in the Bronx Museum Permanent Collection. Whether produced individually or in collaboration, this series of works convey both artists’ commitment to representing their local communities. 

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April 6 to June 26, 2016

 

The South Bronx Trades series, initiated in 2011 and still in progress, documents the active industries and manufacturing enterprises of Port Morris and Hunts Point, revealing to the viewer the unseen places and unheralded workers of the South Bronx. In contrast with the grim imagery often associated with the South Bronx, Fougeron’s photographs show us that industry persists and thrives in the borough. 

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April 6 to May 30, 2016

 

Focusing initially on artists of African, Asian and Latin American descent, the Bronx Museum Permanent Collection was created in 1986 with the goal to reflect the borough's dynamic communities. Beyond The Veil focuses on an eclectic group of contemporary artists in the Permanent Collection whose works convey the complex mediation between the self and the other, between one’s allegiance to tradition and the appeal of globalism.

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March 2 to May 29, 2016

 

Since 2007 Michele Brody has been serving tea to the public through the interactive community-based project Reflections in Tea.  The ritual performance of preparing loose-leaf tea within special paper filters is shared with individuals and groups. The participants’ conversations are then preserved by being transcribed onto the stained tea bags that have been dried and flattened, culminating in the creation of an ever-growing set of fluttering paper quilts. Through the experience of reading participants’ stories, Reflections in Tea reflects back to the public both a visual and visceral experience of their collective memories and experiences.

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February 3 to June 26, 2016

 

Widely recognized as one of the very few female pioneers of Land Art, artist Michelle Stuart is known for her nature-based art dating to the late 1960s and 1970s. Comparatively lesser-known are her remarkable photographic works, which constitute a crucial part of her oeuvre and have been her primary focus over the past several years.

 

Organized by guest curator Gregory Volk, the exhibition consists of twelve recent large-scale works—including a major wall piece created specifically for this exhibition—as well as two important pieces from the early 1980s that can be seen as precursors to Stuart’s later direction.  This exhibition is the first museum treatment of Stuart’s photography-based works.

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